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Kanadajin's visa status


164 posts in this topic

Posted

I find it really strange how many people doubt she passed the JLPT N2 when she went to a language school that's purpose is to pass the N2/N1 and requires you to do so. It's like, if I went to driver's school to get take classes to pass the driver's written exam and people didn't believe I passed it even though I took classes which purpose is to take the written exam and pass before taking a test behind the wheel. 

And yes, America used to be super cheap for renouncing your citizenship but it raised it's prices when the rates of people leaving became higher. It also has something to do with the paperwork involved but I don't really know exactly. It happened a few years ago and it's my main reason why I decided to not do overseas traveling in case I wanted to live there permanently. 

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Posted (edited)

"It is the most dumbest thing to say"

giphy.gif

 

Edited by Miserab
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The JLPT is actually scored based on how you answer.  Sort of like how the SATs are in America.  If you understand how the test works then it can be easy to pass ant level.  Not saying that she actually did this, but if she claims to have gone to a jlpt language school, then they most likely told the students this and showed them how to be able to pass the test.  Personally, I find the JLPT to be useless in speech accuracy but in listening and reading it really helps gauge your understanding.  I would be more inclined to believe she passed N2 if she actually understood what people were saying to her in Japanese.  There are some videos where people will talk to her and she disregards what they say or she answers a question that wasn't asked.  She also doesn't know kanji and has even said as much.  With N2 certification she wouldn't be having these consistant issues.  These are the reasons I don't believe she passed. 

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I would be more inclined to believe she passed N2 if she actually understood what people were saying to her in Japanese. There are some videos where people will talk to her and she disregards what they say or she answers a question that wasn't asked. 

 

But she does that in English too. I honestly think she just doesn't care what others say and just wants to talk about what she wants (which is usually herself and some relation to how Japanese she is.)

Edited by momentomori
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True, but I'm talking about answering something completely off.  Like one time, someone asked her in Japanese where her favorite place in Japan was and she answered convenient.  The person asked her again in a different way and again she answered convenient.  Clearly she was not understanding the question.  

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.........did she mean????? Convenience stores???????!? :notimp:

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The JLPT is actually scored based on how you answer.  Sort of like how the SATs are in America.  If you understand how the test works then it can be easy to pass ant level.  Not saying that she actually did this, but if she claims to have gone to a jlpt language school, then they most likely told the students this and showed them how to be able to pass the test.  Personally, I find the JLPT to be useless in speech accuracy but in listening and reading it really helps gauge your understanding.  I would be more inclined to believe she passed N2 if she actually understood what people were saying to her in Japanese.  There are some videos where people will talk to her and she disregards what they say or she answers a question that wasn't asked.  She also doesn't know kanji and has even said as much.  With N2 certification she wouldn't be having these consistant issues.  These are the reasons I don't believe she passed. 

 

You said it yourself. The JLPT is scored based on how you answer. It's like the SATs. The test has NO Gauge on speaking the language or being able to understand the language fluently even though there is a short listening part. It's an ABCD test essentially And yes, even with JLPT N2 you can in fact be bad at Japanese. You know how many American's have graduated college, been in advanced placement English courses, and still use good instead of well. I can't even spell words like "separate" on my good days and I'm working on becoming a professional writer. Trust me, don't even listen to me speak when I'm tired and I mumble and I say random words that make absolutely no sense. (which is how kanadajin talks like all of the time.)

Like yes, she's not great at Japanese but it's because she went to a school to take the JLPT N2 and after she went to it stopped studying at that level and to grade school level Japanese. So Her Japanese is in between a child's and a beginner who knows advanced words. And yes, I'm going to keep saying this. It's not just Miranda who sucks at a language she claims to be fluent in. I mean, people are technically by definition fluent at their native language and most people suck at it.  She pretty much learned a language and gave up learning it when she declared she was fluent. 

True, but I'm talking about answering something completely off.  Like one time, someone asked her in Japanese where her favorite place in Japan was and she answered convenient.  The person asked her again in a different way and again she answered convenient.  Clearly she was not understanding the question.  

 

Yeah, but it's because she isn't reading the question correctly or skimmed it and misread it. I literally do it all of the time. The issue with her is she defends her answers and doesn't say, "sorry I read the question wrong." Just ignores the fact she read it wrong and blames the other person or ignores them or deletes the response. lmao

.........did she mean????? Convenience stores???????!? :notimp:

 

Most likely. You know she can't spell. 

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Posted

That was probably just her "forgetting" English again. コンビ二アンスストーア>コンビ二, Convenience store>convenient. She's forgotten they aren't shortened the same way. :waatplz:

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.........did she mean????? Convenience stores???????!? :notimp:

 

hahaha no, she actually said benri.  She said 便利だよ。twice.

Edited by Nonamesan
Switched devices to type in Japanese.
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hahaha no, she actually said benri.  She said 便利だよ。twice.

 

Oh, but depending on how it was worded that could be confusing because if it was phrased as "日本のどこが好きですか?" that can be equivalent to "日本のどのところが好きですか" meaning not "where" or "what place" in Japan do you like but actually "what part *about* Japan do you like?" (sorry, I'm not trying to explain to you because I can see you speak Japanese, I'm just trying to clarify my point! :alpacaworry:)

So that makes sense she'd be like "it's convenient!"

But you said they rephrased for her to understand, though, so I'm definitely not doubting she was confused because we all know she lives in her own world where she knows everything... But that's a common mistake :)

...not normally for advanced learners though...... But I agree with Pearl in that her vocab knowledge is advanced while her grammar is shaky.

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If I remember correctly she did post her test scores for the JLPT once? It was a while ago. It didn't say "N2" but it was in the N1/N2 format (differs than the other levels)

I have no doubts she passed N2. She went to the language school and the Japanese she knows, as Pearl says, is all over the place.

 

I'm just confused as how she can get by working in a restaurant with that Japanese.

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Oh, but depending on how it was worded that could be confusing because if it was phrased as "日本のどこが好きですか?" that can be equivalent to "日本のどのところが好きですか" meaning not "where" or "what place" in Japan do you like but actually "what part *about* Japan do you like?" (sorry, I'm not trying to explain to you because I can see you speak Japanese, I'm just trying to clarify my point! :alpacaworry:)

So that makes sense she'd be like "it's convenient!"

But you said they rephrased for her to understand, though, so I'm definitely not doubting she was confused because we all know she lives in her own world where she knows everything... But that's a common mistake :)

...not normally for advanced learners though...... But I agree with Pearl in that her vocab knowledge is advanced while her grammar is shaky.

 

it was a q and a video she did a couple years ago.  The question was 日本の所が好き? To which she replied 便利だよ。 the person rephrased it and said 日本では好きな場所は何? And again Miranda said 便利だよ。i have no idea what she was thinking.  

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it was a q and a video she did a couple years ago.  The question was 日本の所が好き? To which she replied 便利だよ。 the person rephrased it and said 日本では好きな場所は何? And again Miranda said 便利だよ。i have no idea what she was thinking.  

 

...Huh. Guess that's Mira for ya.:doge:

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it was a q and a video she did a couple years ago.  The question was 日本の所が好き? To which she replied 便利だよ。 the person rephrased it and said 日本では好きな場所は何? And again Miranda said 便利だよ。i have no idea what she was thinking.  

 

Yeah, I ran this question and answer by my husband who is a native speaker just to be sure and he didn't understand the answer.  Answering "convenient" doesn't make sense, but it probably could work in English.  

"What kind of places do you like in Japan?"  

"Convenient."  

Still not the best of answers, but it does make some sense.  

In Japanese, it just doesn't work.  You need to answer "Benri na tokoro."  Not the best of answers, but it works.  

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I have no doubts she passed N2. She went to the language school and the Japanese she knows, as Pearl says, is all over the place.

I'm just confused as how she can get by working in a restaurant with that Japanese.

In the two states I've spent most of my life (southwest of the U.S.) there are lots of people here who speak a combination of really broken English and Spanish, but can usually get a point across and be understood by most people. So I'll bet she can get by for the most part.

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