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Sunburns on fair skin?

18 posts in this topic

Posted

I am a very light skinned person ( I literally have to use the lightest foundations I can find on a good day ) and I perpetually get sunburnt with ANYTHING I use.

Ex. Today I went to the beach in FL, I applied SPF 50 sunscreen twice in a 4 hour period and I still burnt so bad I cried and some areas are at risk of blistering.

And when a sunburn happens, I never seem to tan. I burn, stay burnt for a very long time, then go right back to pale, if not a shade darker maybe. 

Is there any immediate advice besides raw Aloe (I've already been applying that almost every 10 minutes), and any advice to prevent this in the future? I have to go out for graduation practice tomorrow for 3 more hours and I'm already fire engine red. 

I also have graduation tomorrow, so if there's anything I can do to reduce the redness for pictures, it would be much appreciated. I already use smashbox's green primer because I have rosacia. 

Sorry for the ranty post. Much appreciated :alpacacrush:

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Posted

I'm the same when it comes to burns, I'm pale as heck despite living in a really sunny place, my skin never darkens and only burns or gets some more freckles.

I generally apply aloe but if you're already doing that I can suggest just lying in a cold bath or putting a cold towel (or ice cubes or what else) on your burnt areas to try and remove some of the heat from the burn, I'd do this until at least it felt somewhat better (if its hurting a lot), this should reduce some of the redness and pain, that generally doesn't make it go away magically but it does make it look and feel better.

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Posted

 

 

Thank you!:alpacacrush:

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Posted (edited)

Sorry to post in a pretty inactive thread, but my school does compulsory first aid training in year 10, and I'd like to share this bit about burns.

With all burns-- cold running water for 20 minuets. Well, not like, fridge cold, but, like, tap water cold. This is to cool the skin and prevent the burn penetrating the skin too much. Now, I'm a bit fuzzy on a lot of the details, it was over two years ago, but

You shouldn't put any sort of moisturiser/aloe gel on fresh sunburn. You should first- cold running water 20 minuets. It has to be running water, as this washes the heat away. Depending on where, this could be a shower that's a nightmare on your water bill, or, holding your hand under the tap for 20 minuets. Then, I think you have to wait a few days, until the burn is mostly healed to put things on it. Just to prevent infection. If it blisters, get your arse to the doctors if it's over a significant portion of your body. I know it's expensive in America, but seriously, skin cancer is no joke.

Also, NEVER PUT ICE ON A BURN. It's dangerous. And, you shouldn't put a towel on a burn. It's a contamination risk.

 

Now, sunscreen. This video is from The Checkout (it's an Australian Consumer Law Comedy Show), and it explains a lot of things surrounding sunscreen, and how it works, how to apply it properly, ect. Generally, use a lot, on everything. The legal stuff won't apply to you, as you're American, but the sunscreen testing, application tips, and storage is universal. There are a few cultural things you won't get in some of the humour, but everything else is pretty universal.

So, I'm a ghostly pale Australian, so I get the not tanning thing. I also don't burn, but that might be because of a few things.

1. I apply sunscreen a lot, and every day if I remember to. A good tip, apply sunscreen at least 15 minuets before going swimming/leaving the house to give it time to sink in.

2. Parasols are your best friend. You will get weird looks, but if you can get a UV parasol, it's a life saver in summer, when it's hotter than satan's arsecrack, and the sun is burning hot. Also, I hate bright lights, and forget sunglasses, so there's that.

3. Stay indoors or in the shade as much as possible. This is a given, there's no better prevention than avoidance. Avoid being in the sun during the hottest parts of the day if you can (from noon to 3pm I think?).


I hope this helps as well!

 

Edited by sachi-the-cat
I was up for way too long last night
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Posted

I don't have much to add since these people gave you such wonderful advice. But next time, I would switch to 100-110 SPF. I use the one by Neutrogena in the lotion and spray on formula.

http://www.neutrogena.com/product/age+shield-+face+lotion+sunscreen+broad+spectrum+spf+110.do?sortby=ourPicks

http://www.neutrogena.com/product/ultra+sheer-+body+mist+sunscreen+broad+spectrum+spf+100-.do?sortby=ourPicks

When letting your sunburn heal, do not put an excess amount of product on, because it will stress the skin. Take some zinc supplements (vitamins)  and drink plenty of water a day to stay hydrated (8 cups). Cool your skin, moisturize it with a non alcohol lightweight cream (use aloe or coconut oil), if it gets worse then contact your local dermatologist or doctor. 

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Posted

I don't have much to add since these people gave you such wonderful advice. But next time, I would switch to 100-110 SPF. I use the one by Neutrogena in the lotion and spray on formula.

http://www.neutrogena.com/product/age+shield-+face+lotion+sunscreen+broad+spectrum+spf+110.do?sortby=ourPicks

http://www.neutrogena.com/product/ultra+sheer-+body+mist+sunscreen+broad+spectrum+spf+100-.do?sortby=ourPicks

When letting your sunburn heal, do not put an excess amount of product on, because it will stress the skin. Take some zinc supplements (vitamins)  and drink plenty of water a day to stay hydrated (8 cups). Cool your skin, moisturize it with a non alcohol lightweight cream (use aloe or coconut oil), if it gets worse then contact your local dermatologist or doctor. 

 

Not all places allow the sale of SPFs over a certain point (Like, in Australia, you can only advertise up to an SPF of 50+), because of some complicated maths stuff that I don't know of the top of my head.

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Not all places allow the sale of SPFs over a certain point (Like, in Australia, you can only advertise up to an SPF of 50+), because of some complicated maths stuff that I don't know of the top of my head.

 

Oh! I'm sorry. I didn't know:alpacaworry:

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Posted

I'm literally the same. Today, I went out with my friend and her parents (we went gold mining) and they didn't believe me when I said I burn really bad even with high SPF sunscreen. Within 10 minutes my friend's mom noticed my face burning. I hid in the shade for the most part after that as to not get a really bad burn :( 

100 SPF stuff doesn't help me much either. I still burn, but less so than I do with the usual 50 SPF.

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I'm literally the same. Today, I went out with my friend and her parents (we went gold mining) and they didn't believe me when I said I burn really bad even with high SPF sunscreen. Within 10 minutes my friend's mom noticed my face burning. I hid in the shade for the most part after that as to not get a really bad burn :( 

100 SPF stuff doesn't help me much either. I still burn, but less so than I do with the usual 50 SPF.

 

I'm so glad someone has the same problem I do! I have a large tattoo on my bicep and I'm so scared I'm going to ruin it in only a few years even with sunscreen D'x

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If you're still getting sunburnt while wearing sunscreen, here's a link:

http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sunscreen-common-mistakes/

Also, some sunscreens that say they are 50 SPF turn out to only be 5 SPF. There was controversy on it for a while, make sure to find sunscreens you know that work. You can get samples of it at skincare stores and the mall. Doing research online based on your skin type will definitely help. Also, just wearing sunscreen won't completely get rid of the problem of getting sunburnt. Using a UVB/UVA parasol, hats, or clothing will help. They are a little pricey, but the product will last and it is definitely worth buying. Staying out of direct sunlight, wearing long sleeves, and keeping cool are important.

 

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Posted

If you're still getting sunburnt while wearing sunscreen, here's a link:

http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/sunscreen-common-mistakes/

Also, some sunscreens that say they are 50 SPF turn out to only be 5 SPF. There was controversy on it for a while, make sure to find sunscreens you know that work. You can get samples of it at skincare stores and the mall. Doing research online based on your skin type will definitely help. Also, just wearing sunscreen won't completely get rid of the problem of getting sunburnt. Using a UVB/UVA parasol, hats, or clothing will help. They are a little pricey, but the product will last and it is definitely worth buying. Staying out of direct sunlight, wearing long sleeves, and keeping cool are important.

 

 

Thank you so much! I'll have to go check that out!

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Thank you so much! I'll have to go check that out!

 

You're welcome!:D

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Posted (edited)

Oatmeal baths will calm your skin. Adding baking soda to the bath water also helps with relieving the irritation. 

5099821009861-GALERY%5B1%5D.jpg

After sun lotions are helpful as they bring back moisture to the skin and they often add things (Vitamin E/Aloe Vera) to help soothe your skin. The number one priority you have after getting a sunburn is moisturizing. Sunburnt skin = Dehydrated skin.

Found an interesting remedy online: "Boil and mash some peeled potatoes, let cool, and apply as a dressing to sunburned areas. It is believed that the starch in the potatoes helps draw out heat, which can reduce pain and speed healing."

 

As for protection I suggest a sports sunscreen that is water resistant. You should apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before. Also, the amount of sunscreen you need for your entire body is a shot glass. Apply every 2 hours and if you are doing water activities, apply after getting out of the water. Honestly the SPF factor doesn't need to be crazy high as the protection it provides tapers off. Europe/Japan/Canada/Australia has made their highest SPF value to 50. The FDA also has a maximum SPF of 50 but they haven't started enforcing it yet. When used correctly, sunscreen with SPF values in the range of 30 to 50 will offer adequate sunburn protection, even for people most sensitive to sunburn.

Edited by SnowFlaker
Australia changed their regulations: http://www.cancer.org.au/preventing-cancer/sun-protection/preventing-skin-cancer/spf50sunscreen.html
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Posted

Oatmeal baths will calm your skin. Adding baking soda to the bath water also helps with relieving the irritation. 

5099821009861-GALERY%5B1%5D.jpg

After sun lotions are helpful as they bring back moisture to the skin and they often add things (Vitamin E/Aloe Vera) to help soothe your skin. The number one priority you have after getting a sunburn is moisturizing. Sunburnt skin = Dehydrated skin.

Found an interesting remedy online: "Boil and mash some peeled potatoes, let cool, and apply as a dressing to sunburned areas. It is believed that the starch in the potatoes helps draw out heat, which can reduce pain and speed healing."

 

As for protection I suggest a sports sunscreen that is water resistant. You should apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before. Also, the amount of sunscreen you need for your entire body is a shot glass. Apply every 2 hours and if you are doing water activities, apply after getting out of the water. Honestly the SPF factor doesn't need to be crazy high as the protection it provides tapers off. Europe/Japan/Canada has made their highest SPF value to 50 while Australia at 30. The FDA also has a maximum SPF of 50 but they haven't started enforcing it yet. When used correctly, sunscreen with SPF values in the range of 30 to 50 will offer adequate sunburn protection, even for people most sensitive to sunburn.

 

 

 

Correction: Australia's maximum SPF that you can advertise is 50+ (60). I should know, I live there.

Also, if you've been burnt you shouldn't sit in still water, it has to be running otherwise the water can heat up from memory. That's why I mentioned cold running water 20 minuets after being burnt, it helps wash the heat out.

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A little late to this thread, even though I don't burn (greek power lol) I do know a lot of remedies and prevention tactics.

After you get burnt, take a cold bath with epsom salts and maybe add some lavender oil to the water. After the bath, slather on a coconut oil, lavender oil, and eucalyptus oil mixture (add peppermint for more cooling if you want). This really helps pull heat out of the skin and begins repair.

Now to help with prevention, I've read a few studies where eating a lot of potassium helps prevent skin issues (i.e. sunburn). Just remember to drink tons of water and exfoliate your skin regularly to keep your skin in its best condition

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